Jaewynn McKay: Do the right thing

Wednesday April 08, 2020 Published in Editorials
An example of not ‘doing the right thing’ was a young woman stopped by police the other day and found to have twice the limit of alcohol in her system, says column write Jaewynn McKay.16061041 An example of not ‘doing the right thing’ was a young woman stopped by police the other day and found to have twice the limit of alcohol in her system, says column write Jaewynn McKay.16061041

Opinion: It’s time now to step up, act more responsibly, and get back to some of the old ways, writes Jaewynn McKay.

 

With the world in turmoil and many countries either formally locked down or virtually so, our government is calling for us to adopt a new ‘social responsibility’. On top of asking us to stay home unless it’s really essential to go out, to wash our hands and maintain separation of at least two metres from other people when out – there is a call to ‘do the right thing.’

An example of not ‘doing the right thing’ was a young woman stopped by police the other day and found to have twice the limit of alcohol in her system. Other examples are the noisey 21st parties and other noisy drinking gatherings the police have had to break up. We’ve been asked to limit the size of our gatherings to a maximum of 10 people – two handfuls.

It’s time now to step up, act more responsibly, and get back to some of the old ways. Like planting food to feed ourselves, tidying up our yards and puna; being kind to each other, spending time with our families.

There has been a noticeable increase in partying and a spike in domestic violence, we need to be kind to our partners and children in these extremely troubled times. The long weekend that’s approaching should not be viewed as a time to party, but more to reflect on the meaning of Easter.

While the fortnightly cargo boats are expected to continue bringing supplies, there is currently only one commercial flight a week from and to New Zealand; drastically reducing the normal opportunities to fly badly injured or sick people to New Zealand. While private medivac flights can be organised with aircraft coming up from New Zealand, each will cost a hefty $100,000 a time, something we can ill afford. Hence why we are being asked to “step-up” and take greater responsibility for ourselves and those who depend on us.

In simple terms this means avoiding activities that have a high chance of risk of hurting either yourself or someone else. These types of activities include – speeding, drinking and driving, driving without a licence, fighting, participating in sporting or other leisure activities when the conditions are less than perfect.

So far all the Covid-19 tests we have taken have come back negative. We are lucky, and one of only a handful of countries in the world to still remain free of this terrible virus. But we still need to maintain our vigilance. Should an outbreak of the disease occur here it will be devastating; our health system would not cope and there would be many deaths.

We need to keep it out. That is why our health authorities continue to test, test and test, and that is what they will continue to do, but their request to us is to, ‘do the right thing’, and urge your family and friends to do the same.

Plant, plant, plant – don’t take the situation out on your partner and children, stay at home, maintain our personal hygiene, and physical separation if you must go out; and keep gatherings down to a maximum of 10 people – with physical separation.

It’s not a lot that’s being asked of us, we can do this. We’re in this together and we’ll come through it together – we’ve go this.

Ko te mea manea rava atu kia rave koe koia oki kia no'o ki te kainga. The most beautiful thing we can do is stay home. 

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