Fall moon shines on ‘mid-autumn’ festival

Friday October 06, 2017 Written by Published in Local
Third year USP Chinese social course students, Marian Gosselin (left) and Sarina Cummings, enjoy a relaxing evening painting Chinese fans, all part of a celebration of the Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival Wednesday evening. 17100427a Third year USP Chinese social course students, Marian Gosselin (left) and Sarina Cummings, enjoy a relaxing evening painting Chinese fans, all part of a celebration of the Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival Wednesday evening. 17100427a

Under a full moon rising for the Chinese Luna calendar celebration, lanterns were beautifully lit up around the University of the South Pacific (USP) campus on Wednesday evening.

 

Students were greeted inside the Confucius Classroom with a serene setting to celebrate the Chinese mid-Autumn Festival and Chinese National day.

Moon cakes and an array of Chinese teas were on offer for students to enjoy, with a backdrop of candles and soothing Chinese music.

Students painted Chinese fans, and some commented on how relaxing the artwork was to produce.

To showcase their Chinese language skills, students have also been learning a Chinese Mid-Autumn song, have written poems about the festival, and last night devoured tasty morsels of moon cakes.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is the second grandest festival in China after the Chinese New Year.

The day is also known as the Moon Festival, as at this time of the year the moon is at its roundest and brightest.

People in mainland China enjoy one day off on the festival which is usually connected with the weekend, and is frequently reserved for spending quality time with family.

The University of the South Pacific (USP) opened the Confucius classroom in its Cook Islands campus in October, 2015

At the time, the Vice-Chancellor and president of USP, Professor Rajesh Chandra, said the Confucius Institute’s vision was to promote multiculturalism and build a harmonious world, through enhancing the understanding of Chinese language and culture in the Pacific.

Chandra said China’s impact and level of engagement in the Pacific region had been profound and was increasing at a rapid pace.

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