The day the music died

Thursday March 19, 2020 Written by Published in Culture
The  talented 6 year old Kaena Short, who wowed the audience last year night with his guest artist performance for the Te Mire Ura. 19050322 The talented 6 year old Kaena Short, who wowed the audience last year night with his guest artist performance for the Te Mire Ura. 19050322

First, the sound was cut on the national composing contest. Now, the National Dancer of the Year competition is swaying off into the sunset.

Te Mire ‘Ura was to have been held in May, but has now been postponed until October.

All functions at the National Auditorium domes have also been suspended.

But the last hopes of the country’s proud performing arts heritage now hang on Te Maeva Nui – for now, no decision has been made to cancel it.

All other current cultural events have been cancelled, but the Ministry of Culture is holding fire on Te Maeva Nui festival, the biggest event on the Cook Islands’ calendar.

A decision is to be made on April 18, after government review the country’s Covid-19 status.

Culture secretary Anthony Turua  said an announcement would be made then, to ensure people had ample time to prepare and make plans – or not – for the event.

Cook Islands Music Association secretary Nga Teao-Papatua said the nine contestants who had registered for Te  Mire Atu, the composers’ contest initially scheduled for this week, understood the decision to postpone.

They fully supported the new scheduled date, in November.

Teao-Papatua said 200 tickets had been distributed; ticket holders should now contact her.

“The postponement was agreed upon unanimously by the executive committee,” she said.  “We will all keep in touch for further updates for the actual date in November of when we host the event for 2020.” 

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