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Opinion

LETTERS: Dealing with increasing prices

Friday 23 September 2022 | Written by Supplied | Published in Letters to the Editor, Opinion

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LETTERS: Dealing with increasing prices

Dear Editor,

Inflation isn’t forever. The question is why is everyone looking towards Europe and the war going on there and blaming the Russians for the soar in prices of produce and petrol etc, etc? No one’s looking towards Saudi Arabia who have the wealth of money but also the oil trade. No one’s talking about them being a major player in the oil and petrol trade.

Inflation will affect us now but not in the long run. April-May 2023 we should start to see a better result. If you think making a move to the French is a better option then good luck. We all know what would happen if French, Chinese or America took us under their Government.

Puna Apaipo

(Facebook)

Don’t buy bread and petrol for a whole month, maybe another bakery opening soon will beat those bread price increases. Time for everyone to get back on to your bikes to get necessities. This is not the bakery’s fault, and no bakery is blamed here for this reason but if this helps anyone else to save a little more that’s good.

Let’s talk inflation rates and how this affects the two above. In the last quarter of CPI (Consumer Price Index), miscellaneous goods and services stood at 4.87, transportation is the highest of all at 9.92 and food and non-alcoholic beverages 4.83. You can see here that the increase is volatile and can increase and decrease at any time.

When was the last time Cook Islands did an HES (Household Economic Survey), what was the sample size? The last was more than 10 years ago. About time they do another, the people are not being heard or can voice their objections to the financial hardships they face in the Cook Islands. What sacrifices do they make to put them into more debts to survive?

Tiare-Amora Pirangi

(Facebook)

Kiaorana. Kia koutou eteau upoko arataki oto tatou basileia. Please, akatanotano ia mai te oko ote kai e pera te moni ate aronga angaanga. Penei ake no reira to tatou au mapu te reva aere kiteau basileia rarahi Kimi angaanga. Te akara anga atu te ki nei to tatou parataito ite au tangata no vao mai. Manako ua teia noku. Kare I tuke rava mei a Tahiti. Our people first, amuri ake to vao mai. Kia mataora te oraanga oto tatou ititangata. Te Atua te aroa. Mauruuru.

Vavia Dean

(Facebook)

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