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Aitutaki experience the magic of Science Expo

Friday 16 December 2022 | Written by Melina Etches | Published in Education, National

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Aitutaki experience the magic of Science Expo
Children on Aitutaki experience looking through the telescope at the Science Expo. Picture: CLIMATE CHANGE/22121306

The first Science Expo on Aitutaki with hopes to inspire the next generation of scientists, drew over 300 people.

The two-day event which had hands-on activities at each booth and prizes from the sponsors concluded on Tuesday.

The University of Otago-led Lab in a Box – a fully equipped mobile research lab – also featured at the Climate Change Science Expo.

Children were excited to experience solar telescopes, gazing at the sun without harming their eyes.

The science festival was initiated by the Tūhura Otago Museum in Aotearoa New Zealand, and was aimed at engaging young people to learn more about science and technology.

Aitutaki school children attend the first Science Expo on the island. CLIMATE CHANGE/22121312
Aitutaki school children attend the first Science Expo on the island. CLIMATE CHANGE/22121312

The theme for the Science Expo was “Synergy of Traditional Knowledge and Science – Keeping it Cool”.

In October the inaugural Climate Change Prime Minister’s Science Expo was held at the National Auditorium and attended by over 1000 students, teachers, locals and visitors.

Prime Minister Mark Brown then said: “Science is in everything we know and use in our lives today, as we have learned from our ancestors who have knowledge of the land, sea and the sky.”

“Our traditional knowledge and science are also important to preserve and continue. It has been passed down from our tupuna to each of us and many things we do from planting to fishing links to this traditional knowledge and science.”