More Top Stories

Regional
Rugby league
Local
Pacific Islands

Pacific news in brief

12 August 2022

Court
National

Competitor at heart

11 August 2022

National

Final counting underway

10 August 2022

Local

The ride of their lives

8 August 2022

Sports
Culture
Opinion
Commonwealth Games
Culture
Environment
Local
Netball
Rugby Union
Editorials

Fiji political polls point to a shift in allegiances says Fijian academic

Thursday 28 April 2022 | Written by RNZ | Published in Fiji, Regional

Share

Fiji political polls point to a shift in allegiances says Fijian academic
Photo: RNZ

Campaigning is underway for the general election in Fiji and early predictions are pointing to a shift in allegiances.

No date has been set yet for the general election in Fiji.

The ruling Fiji First Party led by Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama scraped through at the last election four years ago with the slimmest of margins.

Director of the MacMillan Brown Centre of Pacific Studies at the University of Canterbury, Professor Steven Ratuva said Fiji First's popularity was polling more than 60 percent in the 2014 election.

The head of the MacMillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies at New Zealand's Canterbury University, Steven Ratuva.
The head of the MacMillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies at New Zealand's Canterbury University, Steven Ratuva. Photo: Supplied/Steven Ratuva

He said in 2018 they were closer to 50 percent, and now the polls are indicating popularity levels as low as 22 percent.

"So that alone, if you do another poll and another one, if it talks about the same thing and even if you have a margin of error of about 10 or 20, that means it's going to be a major shift in the political gravity, and there might be a change of government.

Unfortunately, we don't have consistent polling in Fiji, this is when they should be doing it, the major papers like the Fiji Times, the Fiji Sun," he said.

"It's important for the people of Fiji at this particular point in the election to be engaged in the democratic process of providing their views as to who should be there, before the actual election itself. And it's good for political parties as well, whether you are in power or whether you are in opposition," Ratuva said.