Cooks third in shearing World champs

Thursday February 16, 2017 Written by Published in Other Sports
The Team Cook Islands shearing gang was made up of Aaron Bello, Maiden Elers, Tina Elers and Marley Waihape. Aaron and Marley handle the shearing, while Maiden and Tina are the wool handlers.17021411 The Team Cook Islands shearing gang was made up of Aaron Bello, Maiden Elers, Tina Elers and Marley Waihape. Aaron and Marley handle the shearing, while Maiden and Tina are the wool handlers.17021411

A New Zealand-based Cook Islands team put in an almighty effort to finish third in the 17th World Shearing and Woolhandling Championships in Invercargill, New Zealand last weekend.

Mother-and-daughter Tina and Maiden Elers, of Mataura, Southland, took part in the championship which is held every two to four years, alternating locations between the northern and southern hemispheres.

The duo exceeded all expectations by launching their way into at least one of the six finals after a brilliant performance on Thursday night (CI time) last week at the ILT Stadium in Southland.

They managed to get a first-three ribbon after qualifying for the three-team woolhandling final, while Tina went through to top eight for the individual title’s semi-finals.

Tina eventually finished third in the individual final and the pair claimed third place as well in the team’s event.

Tina finished the individual woolhandling final on 205.28 points to finish behind winner Joel Henare (New Zealand) and Mary-Anne Baty (New Zealand).

In the teams competition, Cook Islands managed 169.75 points to finish behind winner New Zealand and Australia.

The Golden Shears World Shearing and Woolhandling Championships is an international event first held in England in 1977.

Although New Zealand has previously hosted the championship, the South Island hosted this event for the first time.

The week-long event, which involved shearers from more than 30 countries, meant organisers had to arrange for a total of around 4500 sheep to be delivered to the stadium. Twenty eight judges, from 15 countries, adjudicated throughout the week.

            

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