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Smoke Signals

Monday February 11, 2019 Published in Smoke Signals
Smoke Signals

College better without mobiles

I applaud Tereora College as a parent after reading its recent newsletter. The college is considering banning the use of mobile phones during school times, which will allow more social interaction between students, more empathy and a readiness to learn at the start of lessons.

It will bring students and teachers together as a result of conversing more with each other, and this will help avoid cyberbullying, and help students’ academic performance improve. Now isn’t this what every parent dreams of? Having mobile phones in school allows them to cheat, learn less, and get more screen time. Some schools have put this ban in place, however, they let it slip away from time to time. More schools should strictly introduce a no mobile phone policy. 

WHAT’S THE TIME MR WOLF?   

Just a shout out to 88FM – great station, great music but not great time telling. One minute past the hour to 29 minutes past the hour should be read like 9.15am or quarter past 9am - or 15 minutes past nine. 29 minutes to the hour to 59 minutes to the hour should be read like 15 minutes to 10am, not 45 minutes past 9am. It’s really annoying as you have to actually calculate what the time really is Mr Wolf. Thank you - keep up the cool sounds.

STOP CHEMICAL SPRAYING

There is no rule for planting and spraying especially where people have built their houses. The spray drifts here there and upwards to homes. This is causing sickness and potentially dangerous side effects. The heavy smell of chemicals is particularly noticeable in hot humid weather. Some have to leave their homes to get away from this hidden menace. Surely there should be planting areas set aside.

An agreement was signed in October 1995 for farmers to go organic. What happened to it? Such a small island could be an outstanding example to other Pacific nations. A visiting scientist conducted tests on pollution here and was shocked at his findings to find higher levels than in New Zealand.