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Smoke Signals

Friday July 27, 2018 Published in Smoke Signals

Police elusive on fire call problems

I read with interest in today’s CIN that a similar question to one I posed about phone calls to the police about the Raromart fire was put to the police spokesperson. He gave a very elusive answer.

There may indeed have been a “deluge” of calls made by others on the main road, but at least three calls were made by residents in the house right next to the fire. They made their independent calls as soon as they spotted the fire. One could assume that being so close, they would most likely have been the very first to ring the 999 emergency number. As previously mentioned, there was no response, so one of the family rode his bike down to the police station and made the report to their front desk in person. If, as claimed by the police spokesperson, there was a deluge of calls which flooded the poor guy at the call centre, all this would have happened after the preliminary failed calls by the three family residents. A simple check of the phone records would establish what time the first calls came in, and from which particular mobile phone, and what time the call centre operator actually responded, and activated the alarm. If he responded to the call from the police station desk, then he was already far too late. My own suspicion is that no-one was on station to take those first calls.

TOO MUCH TRAFFIC

The huge number of tourists and visitors from the Pa Enua on the island becomes clearly evident when you try to cross the main road by the Beachcomber between 8am and 9am on a weekday morning. It takes a very long time to find a gap in the traffic There are way too many vehicles for an island the size of Rarotonga and the deteriorating state of our roads shows that our infrastructure simply can’t handle it. The back road is in a disgraceful state, particularly on the western and southern sides of the island. All we get is patchy repair work, that very quickly fails, leaving even more potholes for long-suffering motorists to drive into.

PRICE HIKES

 

Does anyone monitor the prices charged for produce at the Punanga Nui market? It seems that inflation has suddenly hit some of the fresh produce. Maybe it has something to do with the number of tourists and other visitors currently on the island, but it isn’t fair. On the same subject, who monitors prices in the supermarkets, where the cost of some things often goes up with no explanation? Recently the cost of a container of a certain 500g yoghurt went up by a dollar. No word on why. It can’t have been freight costs because the price of aviation fuel hadn’t risen, as far as I know. Then there’s the other problem of no prices marked on some goods in the supermarkets. So who is to say whether or not the cost is correct or fair?

I read with interest in today’s CIN that a similar question to one I posed about phone calls to the police about the Raromart fire was put to the police spokesperson. He gave a very elusive answer.

There may indeed have been a “deluge” of calls made by others on the main road, but at least three calls were made by residents in the house right next to the fire. They made their independent calls as soon as they spotted the fire. One could assume that being so close, they would most likely have been the very first to ring the 999 emergency number. As previously mentioned, there was no response, so one of the family rode his bike down to the police station and made the report to their front desk in person. If, as claimed by the police spokesperson, there was a deluge of calls which flooded the poor guy at the call centre, all this would have happened after the preliminary failed calls by the three family residents. A simple check of the phone records would establish what time the first calls came in, and from which particular mobile phone, and what time the call centre operator actually responded, and activated the alarm. If he responded to the call from the police station desk, then he was already far too late. My own suspicion is that no-one was on station to take those first calls.

TOO MUCH TRAFFIC

The huge number of tourists and visitors from the Pa Enua on the island becomes clearly evident when you try to cross the main road by the Beachcomber between 8am and 9am on a weekday morning. It takes a very long time to find a gap in the traffic There are way too many vehicles for an island the size of Rarotonga and the deteriorating state of our roads shows that our infrastructure simply can’t handle it. The back road is in a disgraceful state, particularly on the western and southern sides of the island. All we get is patchy repair work, that very quickly fails, leaving even more potholes for long-suffering motorists to drive into.

PRICE HIKES

Does anyone monitor the prices charged for produce at the Punanga Nui market? It seems that inflation has suddenly hit some of the fresh produce. Maybe it has something to do with the number of tourists and other visitors currently on the island, but it isn’t fair. On the same subject, who monitors prices in the supermarkets, where the cost of some things often goes up with no explanation? Recently the cost of a container of a certain 500g yoghurt went up by a dollar. No word on why. It can’t have been freight costs because the price of aviation fuel hadn’t risen, as far as I know. Then there’s the other problem of no prices marked on some goods in the supermarkets. So who is to say whether or not the cost is correct or fair?