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Cyclone Victor moves out of our area

Wednesday January 20, 2016 Written by Published in Weather
The first set of waves floods the “road” in front of Bob Marsters house on Palmerston Island on Sunday. The photo was taken at low tide, at 2.35pm. 16011801 The first set of waves floods the “road” in front of Bob Marsters house on Palmerston Island on Sunday. The photo was taken at low tide, at 2.35pm. 16011801

Cook Islands is out of Tropical Cyclone Victor’s reach.

 

The Cook Islands Meteorological Service said the system was out of the “ jurisdiction” of the country as of 11am yesterday.

Service director Arona Ngari said it was located 250 miles southeast of Niue and 860 miles west of Rarotonga.

Cyclone Victor was travelling at a speed of seven knots with wind close to the centre at 80 knots, gusting at 110 knots, he said.

The cyclone threat track map from the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Nadi, Fiji, showed the category three cyclone was moving further down to the southwest.

Weatherwatch.co.nz said while Cyclone Victor was a very large storm system, it wouldn’t pose much risk to anyone as it looked set to track away from most major islands though it might pack a bit of punch in the wind department.

For the southern Cook Islands, Ngari said it would bring in rain for the next couple of days.

This was welcome news, as parts of the country had been experiencing drought with water levels in reservoirs nearing the bottom mark, and some Rarotonga residents having to put up with water supply problems.

Earlier yesterday, Rarotonga had periods of heavy rainfall which cleared by midday, leaving overcast conditions in the afternoon.

“For us, it will be rain for the next couple of days before we get a fine weather by the weekend,” Ngari says.

Meanwhile, the Cook Islands Tourism Corporation says it’s business as usual for tourism industry in the Cook Islands.

Despite the effects from the passing Tropical Cyclone Victor, the Cook Islands Tourism Corporation in New Zealand says all is well in “paradise.”

The general manager of Cook Islands Tourism Corporation in New Zealand, Graeme West,  said in a media release that while Palmerston Island had been experiencing high seas and strong winds, Tropical Cyclone Victor was tracking southwest of the main tourist islands.

“We’ve been monitoring the situation very closely and it appears that Tropical Cyclone Victor is moving slowly south on open waters between Niue and Rarotonga,” West said.

“The latest meteorological reports say we can expect squally heavy rain, wind and rough seas which will die down and move away mid-week. It’s not damaging. We’re very relieved.”

Cyclone Victor is the third of the projected 12 cyclones predicted to hit the region, including the Cook Islands.

The country earlier escaped the brunt of Cyclone Tuni and Cyclone Ula, both of which caused some damage to neighbouring Pacific island countries.