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Wigmore at food biodiversity talks

Friday March 08, 2019 Written by Published in Politics
William Wigmore at the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. 19030519 / 19030518 William Wigmore at the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. 19030519 / 19030518

Ministry of Agriculture’s director for crop research William Wigmore launched the State of the World’s Biodiversity for Food and Agriculture Report at the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) headquarters recently.

 

This was the first FAO report on the ‘State of the World’s Biodiversity for Food and Agriculture’.

Wigmore was in Rome in his capacity as the Chair for the 17th session of the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture.

According to the Ministry of Agriculture this is a first for the Pacific and involved over 2000 professionals.

FAO states that the report presented mounting and worrying evidence that the biodiversity that underpins the worlds food systems is disappearing – putting the future of food, livelihoods, health and environment under severe threat.

FAO’s report warns that once the biodiversity for food and agriculture is lost such as all the species that support our food systems and sustain the people who grow and/or provide food cannot be recovered.

The report was prepared by FAO under the guidance of the Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture is based on information provided specifically for this report by 91 countries and the analysis of the latest global data.

According to the International Institute for Sustainable development (IISD) the report was welcomed as a major milestone of FAO’s work on biodiversity and genetic resources for food and agriculture.

Wigmore stressed that the report was an important contribution to the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity and the discussions on the post-2020 biodiversity framework.

FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva highlighted that the report covers a gap in knowledge and sets a baseline for the future.

He drew attention to the risks of uniform agricultural production; the need to increase productivity while reducing chemical inputs and preserving forests; and the importance of in situ conservation by farmers.

Delegates considered draft needs and possible actions as follow-up to the report and decided to further develop and revise them with the motivation to adopt a global plan of action at the Commission’s next session in 2021.

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