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Glassie reveals his work for Atiu

Thursday February 21, 2019 Written by Published in Politics

Nandi Glassie says Kau Henry, the chairman of independent candidate Te-Hani Brown, must be “colour blind” not to see the development that took place on Atiu during his time in government.

 

 

Glassie, the Democratic Party candidate for the upcoming Tengatangi-Areora-Ngatiarua by-election, was responding to Henry’s comments that the people of Atiu did not see one dollar of the $5 million the former Health minster claimed to have brought into the island.

“If Glassie is correct and says that $5 million of infrastructure came to Atiu while he was the Member of Parliament, then I ask him to show us where this $5 million went because the people of Atiu did not see one dollar of it,” Henry said in a statement to CI News earlier this week.

Glassie in his reply said it

was absurd coming from someone who spend all his life on Atiu not to see where the dollar went to.

“Unless Kau Henry lives on another island, or has a memory loss, or is colour blind, or cannot comprehend and understand what he’s talking about,” he said in a statement.

Glassie said when he came into office in 2011, he knew exactly what the island needed in terms of infrastructure and other development that were urgently needed by the people of Atiu, because they had a plan.

“I did not introduce a new policy/plan but instead delivered on the wishes of the

people of Atiu that was written in the Island’s Strategic Five Year Plan 2009-2014 of which Kau Henry was party to creating,” he said.

“The plan asks for power upgrade and new generators, road upgrade and sealing, airport upgrade and sealing, harbour improvement plus a secondary alternative landing, upgrade of existing high and low-voltage power lines, new household meters and meter boxes, power poles, upgrade water and provide more household waters tanks. Even solar power.”

Glassie said the projects started to roll for Atiu in 2012 with the island’s Power Generation Upgrade to the power house, and five new state-of-the-art generators that can be remotely controlled without the need for operators on station.

This, he said, was followed by a 12-tonne excavator and a brand new Chinese front-end loader.

In the 2013/14, Glassie said they brought in infrastructure heavy machineries funded by the Chinese government together with agriculture machinery for growers that cost just under $2 million.

This was followed by government-subsidised water tanks (13 x 20,000 litre concrete tanks) funded by the Japanese Grant Fund, the airport side and end clearance and continued maintenance to maintain compliances, he added.

“In 2015, the island received its crusher plant worth over $1 million to produce aggregates for the road and airport. Unfortunately, at present sitting idle because of the lack of raw rocks and poor management,” Glassie said.

“In 2015, through my office, initiative was instigated to formulate a new Strategic Five Year Plan for Atiu and the uncompleted projects identified in the 2009-2014 plan was rolled over into the new plan.”

He said a 10-tonne heavy truck to assist with the road upgrades was brought in.

In 2016, Glassie said trenching and the laying of high

and low voltage power cables in the five villages including the laying of water mains throughout the villages in the same trench as the power lines began.

“The second phase of the water development involves the building of an underground water gallery which is yet to start.

“In 2016/17, road was upgraded with base course aggregates crushed from the island’s crusher, and the first consignment of 100 drums of tar for sealing arrived on to the island. Solar power building and establishment started.”

Glassie said as far back as 2015, government started planning Budget forecast three years in advance so that funding of particular projects was spread out mainly because funding was from local source for the airport, power and water projects.

“These developments happened in the eight years I was in office and so it’s a wonder Kau Henry did not see any of this happening right in front of him.

“The work that’s going on is a follow through of what was started earlier.

“Furthermore, since you made reference to my travel

as minister, at least I left a legacy in my global meetings as the first minister to support and put the first Cook Islander, Elizabeth Iro to a top position

in the World Health Organisation as the chief nurse. No other minister has ever done this

before.”