The Lonely Wheel

Monday October 23, 2017 Written by Published in Local
Rarotonga school pupils have been having plenty of fun over the school holidays. Next week they’ll be heading back to the classroom for their last term of the year. Jackie Rongo 17102006 Rarotonga school pupils have been having plenty of fun over the school holidays. Next week they’ll be heading back to the classroom for their last term of the year. Jackie Rongo 17102006

The 2017 Writing Competition received a good response last month from a number of students who wrote original memoirs for the contest. Ministry of Education learning and teaching advisor Jessica Le Bas coordinated the competition for Year 7-13 students.

The incentive was to encourage young people to write and tell their stories through good writing. Le Bas says it is essential for young people to be able to write and share their stories. “Memoir is an important genre that records the fine details of culture. The things we think are ordinary are often at the heart of what makes us extraordinary. “Of course, writing informs reading, and together they work to improve literacy,” she said. The competition had three sections; Year 7-8, 9-10 and 11-13, with each having a Maori and English category.  The winning entries of each section were announced on September 8 as a part of literacy week.Here is a memoir by Poe Tiare Ruhe-Tararo from Tereora College who won first prize in the Year 11-13 English category.

“If you could turn back the clock, and erase this moment from existence, would you truly be happy?”     

This is a normal day’s train of thought for me. Some days I believed I could push through, that time travel was not an option. On other days I believed that I couldn’t, that forcing the hands on the clock to spin faster, would make me feel better.                                                                                                                                

On this day, I wished that I could end the events forever.                                                                                       

As I walked along the uneven cracked pavement, I noticed that unlike the blue skies imitating a piece by Vincent van Gogh, the pavement is lifeless and holds no character. Its purpose is significant however; it goes unnoticed, reflecting my own feelings. 

The air filled with the scent of earth rained upon, fills my nostrils. The melody of Sir Elton John encapsulates me. Time is made wonderful because I am in it. Every key stroke, every lyric, are sentiments I long to hear in my moments of consciousness.    

The accolade from the crowd sings in my ears as he takes a bow and the curtains close. The unforgiving reality of loneliness returns–I am alone.  I curse that lifeless character, exclaiming “Why must it be this way?”But as much as I despise this lifeless pavement, believing that a party of three could walk carefree, was short sighted.While I curse my friends for excluding me and making me feel unwelcome, I cannot blame them entirely for the incompatibility of their friendship and affection. This third wheel has learnt that strength in character and values can overcome all.
This is the story of the third wheel. This is the story of me.

Note: Cook Islands News will publish more of the winning memoirs in coming weeks.

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