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Joining forces for the good of animals

Monday September 18, 2017 Written by Published in Local
Pictured at the meeting are: (from left) Julie Bateman (TAM), Debbie Topp (EHF), Erika Bult (SPCA), Steph Saunders (SPCA), Sharon Reichardt (SPCA), Trish Barton (TAM) and Gwen Welland (TAM). 17091534 Pictured at the meeting are: (from left) Julie Bateman (TAM), Debbie Topp (EHF), Erika Bult (SPCA), Steph Saunders (SPCA), Sharon Reichardt (SPCA), Trish Barton (TAM) and Gwen Welland (TAM). 17091534

A group of dedicated animal lovers from the Cook Islands SPCA, the new Te Are Manu (TAM) Veterinary Clinic and the Esther Honey Foundation Clinic (EHF) have met to discuss how their organisations can work together to improve the wellbeing of all animals (domestic and livestock) on Rarotonga, Aitutaki, and eventually, the outer islands.

 

The Esther Honey Foundation has provided free veterinary services for more than 20 years, with their focus and resources mostly targeted towards containing the cat and dog population.

However, with only one surgery, a limited number of veterinarians and vet nurses, as well as limited financial resources, the huge demand for their services has been an extremely heavy load to bear.

A spokesperson for the organisations says now that Te Are Manu Veterinary Clinic has been set up on Rarotonga, it will not only share the load, but will work collaboratively regarding veterinary resources.

“The Cook Islands SPCA will continue to focus on its core aims and objectives, these being; to promote the protection and proper care of animals, initiate educational and awareness programmes, make submissions to government on animal welfare legislation, and seek to establish ongoing affiliations with other animal welfare organisations,” the spokesperson says.

“However without the provision of veterinary services from both Te Are Manu and the Esther Honey Foundation, the SPCA’s initiatives could not be achieved.”

Meanwhile, the results of the SPCA’s recent dog population survey on Rarotonga, and an assessment of the number of dogs on the island still capable of breeding, are almost complete.

The survey results will form the basis of an island-wide dog de-sexing campaign to be funded by the SPCA.

“The representatives of the three groups who attended the meeting agreed that the ultimate success of the campaign - on-going management of the dog and cat populations as well as the ability to achieve the best possible level of care for all animals, will depend on each organisation working together towards a common goal,” the spokesperson said.

“Anyone wanting to help out and become involved in any of these organisations will be more than welcome.

“Look for us all on Facebook or contact any of the people in the photo on this page.”

            - Release/SO