Marathon work saves animals

Thursday June 09, 2016 Written by Published in Local
Esther Honey Foundation manager Jo Taylor Kupu is delighted at the outcome of a difficult effort to save 27 animals last week. 16060811 Esther Honey Foundation manager Jo Taylor Kupu is delighted at the outcome of a difficult effort to save 27 animals last week. 16060811

TWENTY-SEVEN animals will now be able to live normal and hopefully happy lives after undergoing successful surgery in the past five days.

 

Thanks to Cambridge, New Zealand veterinarian Dr Richard Willis, his colleagues and Esther Honey Foundation volunteers, the animals now have a new lease of life.

Among the animals operated on were 12 cats, 13 dogs a goat and a pig.

Esther Honey Foundation manager Jo Taylor Kupu said the operations would not have been a successful one without two overseas experts.

She said the series of operations began last Wednesday and ended on Sunday.

“Last week we had Dr Richard Willis fly into Rarotonga from Cambridge in New Zealand and he bought along a colleague, Chris Wood, to do consultations,” Kupu said.

“One of the reasons we needed him here was that we had a backlog on major surgeries.

“For five days we didn’t stop here at Esther Honey and by the time he left on Sunday we had performed almost 30 major surgeries.”

She said the work hadn’t been easy, but clinic staff were thankful that all of the “patients” had done well.

“We amputated legs, we pinned legs, we removed abscesses and cancerous tumours, we removed a number of cats’ eyes, we splinted legs, bandaged, and X-rayed, we treated hematomas and by the time we came up for breath after 12-hour days we had saved 27 animals on our island.”

Most of the surgeries they conducted were on dogs that had been hit by cars, she said.

“Our dogs here are a little road-savvy but they still needguidance to help them become the stop, look left look right look left again concept that we apply to teaching children unfortunately doesn’t transfer over to dogs well. However, they can learn with the help of leashes and guidance.”

Kupu said staff had also had to sedate a pig that had badly injured its leg, and remove a tumour from a goat with cancer.

1 comment

  • Comment Link Grace Ryan Saturday, 11 June 2016 00:39 posted by Grace Ryan

    Thank you soooooo much Dr Willis & colleagues for your tiredless work, we have been travelling to Raro & contributing to Esther Honey for 15 more years now , it really warms our hearts to know there are vets , nurses & volunteers that care and work hard to keep all the animals alive and on the mend . Thank you from us and "meitaki" from all of the animals on Rarotonga !

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