Composting toilet really does the job...

Saturday April 23, 2016 Written by Published in Environment
Matthew Scowcroft (left) did a considerable amount of research before settling on a highly eff ecting composting toilet system designed in Australia. 16042227 Matthew Scowcroft (left) did a considerable amount of research before settling on a highly eff ecting composting toilet system designed in Australia. 16042227

Ikurangi Eco Retreat is leading the way in sustainability with its use of modern composting toilets created by Australian company, Nature Loo.

The system, as explained by Ikurangi co-owner Matt Scowcroft is “the Lamborghini of composting toilet systems.”

Scowcroft researched composting toilets for many months before deciding on this waterless system which uses a 12v fan and urine diverter.

“Basically the idea is that it looks and feels as close to a real toilet as possible. But behind the scenes it is working hard to reduce the impact Ikurangi guests are having on our natural environment.”

With the impacts of tourism on waste management hot news at the moment in the Cook Islands, Ikurangi Eco Retreat feels this is one way they can contribute to a solution and feed their gardens at the same time.

“We’ve had a few guests who weren’t so sure about the composting loos when they first arrived, but after a day or so they come and tell us how ‘normal’ it feels, with a few folks even looking into putting similar systems in their own homes.”

The system is made up of three chamber, each with a three month long process to work through. The first chamber is connected to the toilet and a 12v fan which draws off any excess moisture or smells. After three months of use, this chamber is swapped out and connected only to the fan to further dry out the contents.

After three months it is placed in direct sunlight (with cover intact) for another three months. At the end of this process, the contents then turns into compost. It’s safe to pick up with your hands and use on gardens and the best part, there’s no smell.

After nine months of use of the composting toilets by guests hiring the luxury safari tents, Matt and Luana Scowcroft, along with curious onlookers from Te Ipukarea Society and Cook Islands Tourism turned up to witness the auspicious unveiling of the first batch of compost.

The contents of the modern composting toilet ended up living up to its expectations in revealing compost material which looked (and smelt) like soil. All onlookers where presented with samples of compost to take back home.

The remaining load of compost was then distributed throughout Ikurangi’s organic gardens.Composting toilet really does the job...

Ikurangi Eco Retreat is leading the way in sustainability with its use of modern composting toilets created by Australian company, Nature Loo.

The system, as explained by Ikurangi co-owner Matt Scowcroft is “the Lamborghini of composting toilet systems.”

Scowcroft researched composting toilets for many months before deciding on this waterless system which uses a 12v fan and urine diverter.

“Basically the idea is that it looks and feels as close to a real toilet as possible. But behind the scenes it is working hard to reduce the impact Ikurangi guests are having on our natural environment.”

With the impacts of tourism on waste management hot news at the moment in the Cook Islands, Ikurangi Eco Retreat feels this is one way they can contribute to a solution and feed their gardens at the same time.

“We’ve had a few guests who weren’t so sure about the composting loos when they first arrived, but after a day or so they come and tell us how ‘normal’ it feels, with a few folks even looking into putting similar systems in their own homes.”

The system is made up of three chamber, each with a three month long process to work through. The first chamber is connected to the toilet and a 12v fan which draws off any excess moisture or smells. After three months of use, this chamber is swapped out and connected only to the fan to further dry out the contents.

After three months it is placed in direct sunlight (with cover intact) for another three months. At the end of this process, the contents then turns into compost. It’s safe to pick up with your hands and use on gardens and the best part, there’s no smell.

After nine months of use of the composting toilets by guests hiring the luxury safari tents, Matt and Luana Scowcroft, along with curious onlookers from Te Ipukarea Society and Cook Islands Tourism turned up to witness the auspicious unveiling of the first batch of compost.

The contents of the modern composting toilet ended up living up to its expectations in revealing compost material which looked (and smelt) like soil. All onlookers where presented with samples of compost to take back home.

The remaining load of compost was then distributed throughout Ikurangi’s organic gardens.

2 comments

  • Comment Link Laurie Friday, 24 June 2016 13:01 posted by Laurie

    As one of the early visitors to Ikurangi Eco Retreat, I can attest that for the guests, these loos are absolutely "business as usual". So happy to see that it's proving to be a viable solution to waste management and I hope that many more in the Cook Islands will consider these types of resources to lessen the negative environmental impact.

  • Comment Link Pete Monday, 23 May 2016 23:02 posted by Pete

    Awesome article! Great to see people jumping on board with this idea

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