Written Maori secures future

Tuesday January 21, 2020 Written by Published in Education
George Paniani, left, Ngatoko Rongo and Vae Papatua  at the last Te Kopapa Reo workshop. 19101020. George Paniani, left, Ngatoko Rongo and Vae Papatua at the last Te Kopapa Reo workshop. 19101020.

When a language dies, a culture dies, they say. And that’s why Te Kopapa Reo Maori is doing everything possible to keep our one alive. 

 

Written Maori is the emphasis of a seminar run by Te Kopapa Reo Maori, also known as the Cook Islands Maori Language Commission, that begins today.

Rutera Taripo from Te Kopapa Reo said the focus would be on written Maori using the makarona (macron) and the amata (glottal stop).

The easiest way to learn where the amata and the makarona punctuation marks are positioned in Maori words is by listening and saying the word, said Taripo.

“It will be interesting for those who are not particularly aware of where these marks go.”

People are welcome to come along and listen. “We are not creating new words, we do have our original Maori words; for example, ‘una’ is the Maori word for ‘plastic’.”

Taripo is enthused at the interest in the Maori language. “It’s amazing to see our people are now more passionate in te Reo – taking it all in.”

Last year’s workshops attracted many teachers.

Ngatoko Rongo will lead the classes with the participation of Te Kopapa Reo committee.

The year’s overall focus of Te Kopapa Reo is to strengthen and uplift the Maori language.

“When a language dies, a culture dies; When a culture dies our stories die; When our stories die, our connection dies; When our connections die, our identities die; When our identities dies, we will truly be a lost people.”

The workshop will be held from 1pm to 4pm today (Tuesday), finishing on Thursday at Te Are Karioi (the National Auditorium).

The next Te Kopapa Reo workshop is scheduled for July.

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