Culture ministry practices what it preaches: Turua

Monday April 30, 2018 Written by Published in Culture

Ministry of cultural development secretary Anthony Turua says he is pleased so far with the progress of his department’s National Cultural Policy.

 

The policy, which started in earnest this year, focuses on five strategic areas; language, art and art forms, history and historical places, cultural industry and support and coordination.

“We are practising what we’re preaching, when you look at the promotion of our cultural industry, all the arts and art forms. That’s especially (with our) promoting of our cultural performers on livestream.

“We’re using Facebook and promoting what we’re doing as part of our goals.”

Turua said progress was also being made on the language front, with the ministry gathering “new” Cook Islands Maori words commonly used in schools and government ministries.

The list will be presented to culture minister Teariki Heather, and once approved it will be send through to parliament, which will convene following the election on June 14.

“These are the words that are already in place, but have never been recognised in our national language,” Turua said.

“Because we have the mandate under our legislation, we are presenting the list to the minister for his endorsement, and (the words) will become a part of our national dictionary, our national language.”

Another one of the main goals of the NCP, under “history and historical places”, is to have Highland Paradise fully recognised as a World Heritage Site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO).

Currently, there are still some steps that need to be carried out under the World Heritage Centre provisions that the ministry needs to comply with.

“There’s another body of assessment to show that we’ve met all the criteria, and once that’s done, then it will be our first-ever heritage site recognised at the international level,” Turua explained.

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