Secology helps one island at a time

Tuesday October 11, 2011 Written by Release Published in National

Seacology director Duane Silverstein has visited some of the organisations projects in the Cook Islands, which include initiatives in Rarotonga, Atiu, Mangaia, Mitiaro and Manihiki.

Seacology is an international environmental not-for-profit organisation focused on saving the endangered species, habitats and cultures of islands worldwide. It is based in the United States.

In exchange for the setting aside of areas for conservation, island residents receive help with community-based projects from Seacology.

Silverstein, who was in the Cook Islands last month, says each conservation area is set up, not just to save the community in which it is situated, but to save the world.

Saving the world, one island at a time, is Seacologys motto, he says.

With local field representatives submitting and overseeing projects, the projects really are from the communities themselves. In the end, the community has ownership of the project and takes responsibility for conserving its environment.

Jaime Short, of the National Environment Service, is the Cook Islands field representative for Seacology.

In Mitiaro, Seacology has funded renovations to the islands eight community water tanks as well as hand rails for two natural water caves and has provided 60 wheelie bins for households.

In exchange, Mitiaros community has set aside 2965 acres of forest for conservation for 10 years.

In 2008 Atiu received a new building through Seacology, originally used as a geriatric unit.

It has now evolved into a centre for disabled care and community training such as sewing classes for young mothers.

The Atiu community has established a 297 acre wildlife sanctuary on Takutea Island and a restricted fishing zone for 20 years. Manihiki has received two ultra-violet water purification units and a pump system, including spare parts, in exchange for a 72 acre marine reserve lasting 30 years.

Mangaia has received funding for a boardwalk, having committed to protecting Lake Tiriara.

On Rarotonga, the Muri community received funding to renovate its meeting house and clinic, for re-establishing a 413 acre Raui to protect indigenous marine flora and fauna for 10 years.

Muris meeting house is used for many community events, including meetings of Muris environment care group, workshops, Ngatangiia youth council gatherings, police presentations, other community consultations and exhibitions.

The clinic has been extended to include a small office for a community police officer, and included in its renovations was the installation of an ultra-violet water filter for use by the entire community.

Muris meeting house and clinic also provides room for a water and sanitation project funded through the New Zealand Aid Programme.

Seacology director Duane Silverstein has visited some of the organisations projects in the Cook Islands, which include initiatives in Rarotonga, Atiu, Mangaia, Mitiaro and Manihiki.

Seacology is an international environmental not-for-profit organisation focused on saving the endangered species, habitats and cultures of islands worldwide. It is based in the United States.

In exchange for the setting aside of areas for conservation, island residents receive help with community-based projects from Seacology.

Silverstein, who was in the Cook Islands last month, says each conservation area is set up, not just to save the community in which it is situated, but to save the world.

Saving the world, one island at a time, is Seacologys motto, he says.

With local field representatives submitting and overseeing projects, the projects really are from the communities themselves. In the end, the community has ownership of the project and takes responsibility for conserving its environment.

Jaime Short, of the National Environment Service, is the Cook Islands field representative for Seacology.

In Mitiaro, Seacology has funded renovations to the islands eight community water tanks as well as hand rails for two natural water caves and has provided 60 wheelie bins for households.

In exchange, Mitiaros community has set aside 2965 acres of forest for conservation for 10 years.

In 2008 Atiu received a new building through Seacology, originally used as a geriatric unit.

It has now evolved into a centre for disabled care and community training such as sewing classes for young mothers.

The Atiu community has established a 297 acre wildlife sanctuary on Takutea Island and a restricted fishing zone for 20 years. Manihiki has received two ultra-violet water purification units and a pump system, including spare parts, in exchange for a 72 acre marine reserve lasting 30 years.

Mangaia has received funding for a boardwalk, having committed to protecting Lake Tiriara.

On Rarotonga, the Muri community received funding to renovate its meeting house and clinic, for re-establishing a 413 acre Raui to protect indigenous marine flora and fauna for 10 years.

Muris meeting house is used for many community events, including meetings of Muris environment care group, workshops, Ngatangiia youth council gatherings, police presentations, other community consultations and exhibitions.

The clinic has been extended to include a small office for a community police officer, and included in its renovations was the installation of an ultra-violet water filter for use by the entire community.

Muris meeting house and clinic also provides room for a water and sanitation project funded through the New Zealand Aid Programme.

Leave a comment